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On the Path to Treating Myelofibrosis

Medical Provider Examines Pelvic Bone

Myelofibrosis (MF) is a rare condition that occurs in the bone marrow, disrupting the body’s normal production of red and white blood cells. This type of cancer, which causes scarring in the bone marrow, can develop on its own or from another bone marrow disorder. Patients diagnosed with MF are prone to frequent infections, can develop anemia, tend to bleed and bruise easily, and often suffer from discomfort due to an enlarged spleen.  

Historically, the anti-cancer drug Jakafi (Ruxolitinib) has been used to try to treat Myelofibrosis. However, it has limited effects and only about a third of patients with MF have seen improvement. Xpovio (Selinexor), another anti-cancer therapy, has shown positive outcomes in a number of blood cancers such as lymphoma and myeloma and is now FDA approved to treat those diseases. The Innovative Clinical Research Institute (ICRI) at The Oncology Institute is conducting a clinical trial that evaluates the safety and efficacy two anti-cancer drugs known as Jakafi (Ruxolitinib) and Xpovio (Selinexor) when combined.  

“This trial could lead to more effective and safe treatments for this disease which cannot be cured aside from a bone marrow transplant,” said Dr. Amitabha Mazumder, TOI physician and Principal Investigator for the study. “Bone marrow transplants are high risk procedures and can only be performed in a few patients.”  

Patients with MF who have not had treatment before for their disease are eligible for this trial.  Those interested in participating in the trial should have adequate blood counts, kidney and liver function, as well as a large spleen as the effects of the therapies on these systems will be measured and monitored throughout the study. Jakafi will be given twice daily and Selinexor, given weekly. 

The expected completion date for the study is November 2023. This trial is being conducted by the research of The Oncology Institute, ICRI at the following locations: Glendale, Long Beach, Pasadena, Santa Ana and Whittier.  

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